Nursing Degree Guide Online Nursing Degrees and Schools 2017-02-10T17:46:08Z http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/feed/atom/ WordPress Site Administrator <![CDATA[Florence Nightingale’s Influence in Becoming an RN]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/2010/florence-nightingale%e2%80%99s-influence-in-becoming-an-rn/ 2010-03-29T19:17:53Z 2010-03-29T19:17:53Z Florence Nightingale has been a vital figure for the nursing community for the past century, a pillar of what nursing is truly about.  Since this point, there have been other influential nurses, but none so much as Florence Nightingale, who is known outside the nursing community. Nightingale has become such an extraordinary figure in the […]

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Florence Nightingale has been a vital figure for the nursing community for the past century, a pillar of what nursing is truly about.  Since this point, there have been other influential nurses, but none so much as Florence Nightingale, who is known outside the nursing community. Nightingale has become such an extraordinary figure in the health industry not because of her skills as a nurse, but her goals for the future of nursing and her desire to transform the nursing industry in the nineteenth century.

Florence Nightingale boasts an impressive resume of service, stemming from her original work in the Crimean War.  Through this service, she risked her life to tend to injured soldiers on the battlefield at night, often coming directly into the line of fire, but never once faltered.  After this point, she campaigned for reform in the nursing community, attracting a new breed of nurses who were able to uphold the values she came to embody.  While the modern era does not have as much room for reformation as the nineteenth century, many nurses today still strive to be as diligent to their cause as Florence Nightingale was. 

Nightingale made it clear that nursing was more than simple health care, but was about connecting with patients and ensuring that everyone was attended to, despite the circumstances.  Much of Nightingale’s family memoirs suggest that she worked herself and those around her to death through her never-ending campaign to deliver the best health care and nursing care to patients and to ensure they all had equal advantages.  It almost seems like this type of devotion had to happen for nursing to develop into what it is today.  It is hard to realize that nursing was not considered to be an adequate form of employment for a woman to go into at the time Florence Nightingale worked; she defied much of her family and social norms at the time to deliver this type of revolution in the nursing community. 

If we have learned anything from Florence Nightingale’s life story, it is that nursing envelops much more than administering health care.  It is about connecting with patients, ensuring that every person is given the same level of health care, and striving to make reforms within the community.  We have come so far from Nightingale’s time in which nursing was a despised form of labor; nursing is now considered to be one of the most respected career choices.  However, we cannot forget the nurse who paved the way for nursing to be what it is today and who continues to inspire many of us to become RNs. 

 

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[Best Nursing Degrees for 2010]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/?p=385 2010-02-03T17:37:21Z 2010-02-03T17:37:21Z It’s a brand new year, which means more opportunities to earn nursing degrees!  It is only a matter of determining what is the greatest need in the nursing industry, as well as what you will be most comfortable earning.  Nursing degrees range from pediatric degrees to geriatric degrees.  Far from being generalized, like so many […]

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It’s a brand new year, which means more opportunities to earn nursing degrees!  It is only a matter of determining what is the greatest need in the nursing industry, as well as what you will be most comfortable earning.  Nursing degrees range from pediatric degrees to geriatric degrees.  Far from being generalized, like so many people think they are, nursing degrees can be anywhere from the extraordinarily broad to the highly specialized. 

The past year has indicated that the health care industry has nearly run into a shortage of both physicians and nurses who practice general medicine.  Instead of earning a specialized degree, 2010 seems to be the year to earn your registered nurse degree and work in either a clinic or hospital, ready to assist for a variety of patients.  While this seems like a relatively easy degree to earn, general nursing degrees require a background in nearly every type of patient imaginable.  More than the recognition of general nursing, you will earn the respect of the clinic you work for through your ability to mold to any situation that comes your way.

If you want to take an unconventional route, then look into earning a nursing degree that will allow you to work outside the country and do some work for the Red Cross or another aid organization.  The nurses who are on the scene at Haiti are lifesavers for thousands of children and individuals who would not have survived if not for their help.  This is only one example of ways in which the Red Cross can help countries in need; the Red Cross deploys aid workers around the world, focusing on impoverished nations such as Zimbabwe and the Sudan, countries which are struggling to stay afloat even with aid.  This is a life-changing experience, and as a nurse, you should try similar programs out to expand your horizons and your degree options.

Pediatric care is drastically rising as we have experienced a boom in children’s health care and new clinics have opened up around the country.  Pediatric nurses are better equipped to handle younger children and degrees in this type of nursing require students to be patient as well as knowledgeable of the many complications that can arise with young children.  Children are highly susceptible to much more than adults are, and need special care to ensure they make it to adulthood.  While pediatrics is not for everyone, it is rapidly becoming a sought after career choice for students of nursing.

Regardless of what type of nursing degree you want to earn, either RN or LPN or even nursing assistant, there are many options available for you and your future goals. 

 

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[Why Get a Nursing Degree?]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/?p=382 2010-02-03T16:45:55Z 2010-02-03T16:45:55Z With the economy in the position it is currently in, many people have had more of an incentive to continue on with a higher education, more specifically in programs in nursing and criminal justice (in which there have been a high demand of employees).  As a result, nursing programs have become more advanced and offer […]

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With the economy in the position it is currently in, many people have had more of an incentive to continue on with a higher education, more specifically in programs in nursing and criminal justice (in which there have been a high demand of employees).  As a result, nursing programs have become more advanced and offer much more to students than ever before.

Nursing degrees seem to be extremely confined to one field, but offer students a wide range of options to choose from.  Nursing programs can range anywhere from rehabilitative care to pediatric care, and can involve a number of degrees including associates, bachelors, masters, and even doctorate.  Additionally, new “bridge” programs make the transition within health care workers such as LPNs and EMTs easier than ever before, and more cost efficient.  The starting salary for registered nurses is now around $50,000 a year, although this amount is bound to change with increased schooling and further years of experience.  Additionally, the possibilities are nearly endless for a future in health care management, which involves a great shift from your status as a registered nurse.

Earning a nursing degree is only the first step in the process of entering into the health care industry, a major step that can result in a Masters in Health Care or a Doctorate in Health Care Management.  Now more than ever, nursing degree programs have allowed students from all walks of life to earn degrees in all areas of the health care industry.  Online education has additionally expedited this process as students are offered the opportunity to earn degrees from the comfort of their own home as well as through an alternate cost efficient option. 

Online nursing degree programs range from the traditional program that requires 30-60 hours of fieldwork to bridge programs that offer students the opportunity to continue their education after achieving a certain amount of education in the medical field.  Students from anywhere in the world are now able to earn nursing degrees without the stress of attending class on a specific schedule that can conflict with their working or family life.  Online education caters to students’ own schedules and allows students to pick and choose what kind of classes they want to take, as well as when they will be able to complete their work.

Nursing degrees are now widely available to any type of student which is why so many individuals are now opting to enter their foray into the health care industry.  With so many available positions, the nursing industry seems set to experience a boom in the coming years with the easy accessibility of programs around the nation. 
 

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[100 Weird Phobias That Really Exist]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/?p=379 2010-01-07T14:10:38Z 2010-01-07T14:10:38Z In order to quickly and correctly identify underlying issues that are ailing your patients, you'll need to educate yourself on some of the weird conditions out there. Our list of 100 weird phobias may help you when you least expect it.

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As a nurse, you come into contact with all kinds of bizarre and weird conditions on a daily basis. But just when you think you’ve seen it all, you’re going to face a new challenge that your formal nursing training didn’t prepare you for. In order to quickly and correctly identify underlying issues that are ailing your patients, you’ll need to educate yourself on some of the weird conditions out there. Our list of 100 weird phobias may help you when you least expect it.

Social Phobias

These anxiety disorders are triggered by certain types of people, relationships, and social situations.

  1. Venustraphobia: Also known as caligynephobia, this is the fear of beautiful women, and may be caused by low self-confidence or putting too much pressure on appearances.
  2. Anthropophobia: This phobia literally refers to the fear of people but can also mean the fear of having company.
  3. Aphephobia: This phobia causes people to feel afraid when touched.
  4. Autodysomophobia: If you have a bad or "vile" odor, you may trigger someone who has autodysomophobia.
  5. Deipnophobia: Dinner parties, dining and dinner conversation are all off limits for people who suffer from this phobia.
  6. Nomophobia: This modern phobia affects people who are very afraid of losing cell phone contact.
  7. Soteriophobia: Some seriously independent-minded individuals may have soteriophobia, or the fear of becoming dependent on someone else.
  8. Sociophobia: Those who fear being judged by society suffer from sociophobia.
  9. Gamophobia: It’s not just an excuse: some people actually have a valid fear of getting married.
  10. Syngenesophobia: While there are certainly jokes about scary stepmothers or in-laws, this phobia refers to the fear of all relatives.
  11. Ecclesiophobia: The fear of church and going to church is called ecclesiophobia.

Zoophobias

Many people are afraid of snakes, rats or bats, but these phobias represent the fear of more random animals.

  1. Ornithophobia: The fear of birds — especially pigeons — is referred to as ornithophobia, and is actually a fairly common phobia.
  2. Lutraphobia: While some people think they’re cute, others are afraid of otters.
  3. Equinophobia: The fear of horses is also called equinophobia.
  4. Zemmiphobia: It certainly sounds frightening: zemmiphobia is the fear of "the great mole rat."

Natural Environment Phobias

Wind, the Northern lights, and even flowers are just too stressful for people with the following phobias.

  1. Aerophobia: Those with aerophobia — the fear of drafts, air swallowing and airborne diseases or germs — may wish to wear face masks, especially in public.
  2. Pteridophobia: For some, being near ferns is too frightening.
  3. Anthophobia: Most people are happy to receive flowers, but anthophobia refers to the fear of them.
  4. Ancraophobia: The fear of wind is also called anemophobia.
  5. Heliphobia: Nighttime hours come as a relief for those who are afraid of sunlight.
  6. Auroraphobia: Those who are afraid of the Northern Aurora lights have auroraphobia.
  7. Chionophobia: Instead of hoping for snow, those with chionophobia must dread it.

Personal Phobias

People who have trouble dealing with certain aspects of their own character or appearance suffer from these phobias.

  1. Spectrophobia: Those who are too afraid to look at their own reflection in a mirror have spectrophobia.
  2. Athazagoraphobia: Athazagoraphobia is the fear of being forgotten, and also the name of this blog.
  3. Gelotophobia: Those who fear being laughed at — and actually evaluate social situations for "signs of laughter and ridicule" — suffer from gelotophobia

Physical Objects

From red lights to knees, here are some weird phobias involving physical objects and body parts.

  1. Selenophobia: Selenophobia is the term for the fear of the moon.
  2. Asymmetriphobia: If you’re afraid of mismatched socks or asymmetrical objects, you have asymmetriphobia.
  3. Aurophobia: Most people would be ecstatic to have the chance to find gold, but people who suffer from aurophobia are petrified of it.
  4. Ereuthophobia: The fear of red lights is called ereuthophobia.
  5. Genuphobia: Knees can cause great irritation and fear in people with genuphobia.
  6. Automatonophobia: The fear of human-like figures, like dummies or wax figures, is called automatonophobia.
  7. Atephobia: Visiting ancient Greek or Roman ruins would be a nightmare for those with atephobia, or the fear of ruins and old buildings.
  8. Aulophobia: Aulophobia refers to the fear of flutes.
  9. Dextrophobia: People with this phobia do not like having objects situated to their right.
  10. Linonophobia: Though it’s useful, string is the cause of anxiety for people with linonophobia.
  11. Papyrophobia: Paper is the cause of great anxiety and even fear in people who suffer from papyrophobia.
  12. Domatophobia: One wonders where people with this phobia — the fear of houses and being inside houses — live.

Ideas and Concepts

Certain intangibles cause a lot of anxiety and irritation in some people, even seemingly harmless ideas like depth or newness.

  1. Tachophobia: Anyone who suffers from tachophobia — the fear of speed — may be afraid of riding in cars or trains.
  2. Xerophobia: The fear of dryness is also called xerophobia.
  3. Arithmophobia: Arithmophobia means to the fear of numbers generally, but can also refer to the fear of math, numerals, certain numbers, calculations, and/or calculus.
  4. Bathophobia: This obscure phobia refers to the fear of depth.
  5. Cainophobia: Sometimes called cainotophobia, this is the fear of anything new.
  6. Macrophobia: Doctor’s offices and holiday shopping trips must be nightmares for people who suffer from macrophobia, or the fear of long waits.
  7. Hagiophobia: Holy figures and holy things or ideas are feared by people with hagiophobia.
  8. Sophophobia: Those who are afraid of learning anything new have sophophobia.
  9. Barophobia: While it’s common to have a fear of flying or a fear of heights, others have a fear of gravity, or barophobia.
  10. Rhabdophobia: This anxiety disorder means several things: the fear of magic and a magic wand, being beaten by a rod, or being very harshly criticized.
  11. Symbolophobia: Figurative and symbolic ideas can become a legitimate phobia for some.
  12. Chronophobia: The fear of time is referred to as chronophobia.
  13. Mnemophobia: The fear of memories is called mnemophobia.
  14. Philosophobia: It can be a challenging subject, but for some individuals, philosophy is legitimately terrifying.

Activities

Sitting, standing and walking are sore spots for people who suffer from these and other phobias.

  1. Ablutophobia: Ablutophobia is the fear of washing or bathing.
  2. Amaxophobia: The fear of riding in cars is referred to as amaxophobia, and can cause problems especially for those living in suburban areas.
  3. Agyrophobia: Even if there are no cars around, some people still suffer from the fear of crossing roads.
  4. Chorophobia: Weddings, prom, and parties must pose lots of problems for those who suffer from the fear of dancing.
  5. Ergophobia: If you miss a day at the office, you could try telling your boss that you’ve suddenly developed ergophobia, or the fear of work and/or functioning.
  6. Kyphophobia: Being in the stooping position causes too much anxiety for people with kyphophobia.
  7. Mageirocophobia: Cooking is a source of anxiety for people with mageirocophobia.
  8. Scriptophobia: A common phobia is the fear of speaking in public, but scriptophobia is the fear of writing in public.
  9. Sitophobia: The fear of eating is called sitophobia, and can become very serious.
  10. Basiphobia: Those who are too afraid to walk or stand because of the possibility of falling have basiphobia.
  11. Cathisophobia: Conversely, this is the fear of sitting down.

Group or Race Phobias

These prejudicial phobias are the result of the fear of random groups of people.

  1. Bolshephobia: Some people are afraid of meeting or hearing about Bolsheviks, and their disorder is called Bolshephobia.
  2. Apotemnophobia: People with amputations cause fear and anxiety in those who suffer from apotemnophobia.
  3. Walloonphobia: This disorder refers to the fear of Walloons, a group of people of German and Celtic origin living in Belgium.
  4. Parthenophobia: Those who are afraid of virgins and young girls suffer from parthenophobia.
  5. Ephebiphobia: This term refers to the fear of teenagers.
  6. Pedophobia: Children are actually frightening to people with pedophobia.
  7. Dutchphobia: Some people believe that the Dutch are upsetting, perhaps because of their traditional costumes.
  8. Heterophobia: Homophobia is a well-known, though controversial, phobia, but heterophobia refers to the fear of heterosexuals.
  9. Transphobia: The fear of transsexual or transgender people is called transphobia.
  10. Hoplophobia: The fear of people who own firearms is called hoplophobia.
  11. Iatrophobia: Those who are afraid of or discriminate against doctors have iatrophobia.

Sickness and Injuries

The fear of particular diseases and injuries are outlined in this list.

  1. Albuminurophobia: This very specific phobia refers to the fear of kidney disease.
  2. Aeronausiphobia: Phobialist.com describes this phobia as the fear of vomiting due to airsickness.
  3. Amychophobia: People who suffer from amychophobia — the fear of scratches — are probably very protective of themselves and their skin.
  4. Anklyophobia: Some people are actually afraid that their joints will stop working, and this fear is called anklyophobia.
  5. Blood-injection-injury type phobia: This odd phobia group includes trypanophobia (the fear of injections); hemophobia (the fear of blood) and the fear of invasive medical procedures.
  6. Body dysmorphic disorder: Also referred to as BDD, this body image disorder causes people to imagine that they have or will develop physical deformities.
  7. Ataxiophobia: The fear of not being able to use your muscles properly is called ataxiophobia.
  8. Injury phobia: If you’re afraid of being injured, you have injury phobia.
  9. Syphilophobia: One hopes that having a fear of syphilis would inspire more responsible romantic encounters.
  10. Chemophobia: Those who get too carried away with organic diets or going green may be at risk for chemophobia, a condition that refers to the fear of all chemicals and preference for natural elements.
  11. Rhypophobia: People who are afraid of defecation have rhypophobia, and are at risk for other health problems.

Truly Bizarre Phobias

In this list, you’ll find some of the weirdest phobias out there, from the fear of purple to the fear of constipation.

  1. Allodoxaphobia: If you like to voice your thoughts on a particular subject, you may want to stay away from people with allodoxaphobia, or the fear of opinions.
  2. Porphyrophobia: The color purple causes some people to be very afraid and develop this condition.
  3. Arachibutyrophobia: If you’re desperately afraid of peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth, you have arachibutyrophobia.
  4. Blennophobia: Unless you’re in a science fiction movie, you probably won’t come into contact with slime, but some people are afraid of it anyway.
  5. Cardiophobia: Although the heart is your lifeline, some people are afraid of it.
  6. Coprastasophobia: Some people are actually terribly afraid of becoming constipated.
  7. Didaskaleinophobia: If you’d rather skip class, just claim this phobia, which refers to the fear of going to school.
  8. Nomatophobia: This phobia refers to the fear of names.
  9. Lipophobia: The fear of fats in food may be blamed on the red meat scare of 1977.
  10. Hormephobia: Hormephobia refers to a person’s fear of experiencing shock, which is probably made more likely after an anxiety attack.
  11. Sesquipedalophobia: This term refers to the fear of long words, and seems like a cruel joke.
  12. Phobophobia: This condition is described as a rare disorder and refers to the fear of having a phobia.
  13. Hellenologophobia: Confusing, highly technical terminology — including Greek terms — make those with hellenologophobia anxious.
  14. Cymophobia: It’s understandable that some people might be afraid of waves, but this phobia also refers to the fear of "wave-like motions."
  15. Pteronophobia: The idea of being tickled with feathers is upsetting for those with pteronophobia.
  16. Optophobia: Opening one’s eyes is just too stressful for some individuals.

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[The Changing Prominence of a Nursing Degree]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/?p=390 2010-03-29T19:20:32Z 2010-01-05T19:20:02Z Health care has quickly become an industry that has seen an increased demand for workers in the past decade, in stark comparison to the many other industries that have had to cut corners.  This has come at a time of economic uncertainty and has led to valuable options for many families.  Nursing degrees in particular […]

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Health care has quickly become an industry that has seen an increased demand for workers in the past decade, in stark comparison to the many other industries that have had to cut corners.  This has come at a time of economic uncertainty and has led to valuable options for many families.  Nursing degrees in particular have become increasingly important, and more schools than ever now offer bachelors and masters degrees in nursing, as well as dual degree programs in health care administration and nursing. 

The economy has paved the way for new career choices in a variety of fields, the top of which is the health care industry.  Due to the rising number of students who earn degrees in specialties of medicine, many communities are still left with a demand for general practitioners and general nursing specialists.  Even other professions have taken note of this new demand for health care professionals, as many law firms now require their attorneys to take distance learning classes on health care law and nursing in order to be better adept to handle cases in this realm. 

Online education classes has helped fill this gap in the health care industry, as more students than ever have been able to earn nursing degrees by taking their first year of nursing school online and finishing up at a local school with their residency requirements.  Other students are able to earn Masters in Health Care Administration and related degrees through online programs, opening up a wide array of jobs and future careers for these students, stemming from their original nursing degree.  Nursing programs have become equally prominent in traditional schools as well, and most public schools have nursing degree programs now that attract thousands of students every year. 

This increase in demand of nursing degrees was predicted as early as the 1990s, as many schools prepared for this influx by incorporating more nursing programs into their curriculum and developing dual degree programs to attract even more students to their health programs.  While most students typically only want a nursing degree at first, this foray into the health care industry can typically lead to further degrees to cement their career options.  The health care industry continues to flourish amid the economic crisis due to advancing technology, new prescriptions, and an overall need for health care providers.  This looks to be a continuing trend, and nursing degrees are on the frontline of the health care industry. 

 

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[10 Different Types of Nurses for the Undecided Student]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/?p=387 2010-02-03T17:38:32Z 2010-01-02T17:38:09Z Becoming a nurse is a big career move and one that will impact both your life and your future patient’s life.  Therefore, learning what is out there first can make a big difference in deciding what school to attend and what hospital or clinic to do your fieldwork training at.  •    Air Force and Navy: […]

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Becoming a nurse is a big career move and one that will impact both your life and your future patient’s life.  Therefore, learning what is out there first can make a big difference in deciding what school to attend and what hospital or clinic to do your fieldwork training at. 
•    Air Force and Navy: This type of nurse is great for students who want to be a member of the armed services, but additional become part of the health care industry.  The Air Force and the Navy both offer scholarships to their members to enroll in nursing school, therefore making the school process much easier.  Knowing that you have a place after graduation in a field you enjoy makes this type of nursing that much more beneficial.
•    Gerontology: This is the branch of medicine that studies the biological aspects of aging, much different from geriatrics, which studies the disease of the elderly.  Becoming trained in this nursing specialty is a very rewarding career choice, as it allows you to aid doctors in making advances in many vaccines which can prevent the effects aging has on our population.  While this is a more specialized nursing discipline, it shows the most promise in the coming years, as our elderly population continues to rise.
•    Pediatric: In a sharp transition from the elderly, a career in pediatrics is one which many students of nursing dream of: what better way to spend your day than to play with children all day?  While this is clearly not the day many pediatric nurses have, pediatrics has many different benefits and can lead to positions as a school nurse or a permanent position in the pediatrics wing of a hospital. 
•    Neuroscience: Another budding field in the health industry is that of neuroscience.  While nurses are not in the same realm as doctors in performing the surgeries, becoming a neuroscience nurse means understanding the care that a neuroscience patient requires and doing everything in your power to provide the support these patients need.  As the field expands, the amount of neuroscience patients seems set to expand as well, making it one of the fastest growing fields.
•    Occupational: This type of nurse specializes in ensuring that the work place is safe and healthy, promoting healthy practices throughout companies.  Many of these nurses travel to different companies and instill the hazards of the common cold in a work environment and teach ways to combat illness at work. 
•    Oncology: New cancer patients are stricken with the disease every day, producing a new need for oncology nurses who can administer the care these patients require.  New treatments are in the works every year, and oncology nurses help provide education to their patients about the treatments as well as a sense of hope.
•    Operating Room: Operating room nurses are there in the nitty gritty of health care and get to witness surgery first hand, all while assisting the doctor.  These nurses usually have more of a pension for the “gore” of intestines than the average clinical nurse, but play an important role in the infrastructure of hospitals.
•    Rehabilitation: Patients in rehab are typically very frustrated with their predicament, and it is rehab nurses who can coach them back to health and encourage them to keep trying.  No one expects to be involved in a terrible accident that renders your legs useless, but when this type of tragedy occurs, rehab can help bring your legs back to the way they once were with the aid of a rehabilitation nurse.
•    Ostomy and ET: Ostomy and ET nurses provide care for patients who have stomas, tubes, wounds, and incontinence.  Most of the day, these nurses have to evaluate the progress of a patient and ensure that any issues they may have with their colons or intestines continues to be monitored throughout the day.
•    Long-Term Care: These nurses are typically found in nursing homes or ordinary homes, and provide care for patients whose families cannot care for them on their own.  These nurses typically only have one or two patients, although their time revolves around ensuring these few patients have every need met and are receiving the care they are entitled to.

In the end, there are many, many different types of nursing jobs you can go into, it is only a matter of what is the best suited position for your desires in nursing. 

 

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[Balancing Work and Life as an Obstetrics Nurse]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/?p=343 2009-12-14T17:03:22Z 2009-12-14T17:03:22Z Studies have recently come out that indicate which careers are most suitable for balancing a career and a family for women around the country.  Surprisingly, medical careers were the top ranked within the study, as once women get past the grueling hours of the first years, they are able to settle into a career in […]

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Studies have recently come out that indicate which careers are most suitable for balancing a career and a family for women around the country.  Surprisingly, medical careers were the top ranked within the study, as once women get past the grueling hours of the first years, they are able to settle into a career in their 30s and prepare for a family life and a career that allows them more flexibility than financial careers allow (according to the study). 

According to a recent National Survey, doctors and nurses in their late 30s and early 40s work less than 35 hours a week, compared to the 60+ hours of lawyers and MBA graduates.  Obstetrics has emerged as one of the top medical jobs that offer a flexible schedule to nurses and doctors in the field.  It would appear that at first sight, nurses and doctors of obstetrics would be forced to operate on a different person’s clock (when the baby wants to come out, it comes out), but over time, the higher ranks of female obstetricians have changed this waiting period.  Now, most obstetrics professionals operate in group practices that allow a primary obstetrician to not be confined by a small window.

These group settings allow obstetric nurses to be less confined in their schedule and able to participate in more activities outside of work.   Many other professional careers do not follow the group-practice mentality because they feel that such intense workloads cannot be split between various partners, although this cannot always be true.  Older ideals of obstetrics careers required nurses and doctors to be available 70 hours a week or more, but the evolution of the field has led to the current norm of group practices where only a few decades ago would have been unheard of. 

Women have consistently grappled with the work-life balance and their seeming inability to have both career and family goals at the same time.  However, obstetrics is one of the anomalies within the professional world: a career that allows women doctors and nurses the ability to work 40 hours a week at the most and the flexibility in tending to their families while still retaining a higher-ranking position.  This may trickle down to other specialties, but currently obstetrics nurses are one of the best careers that will allow you to split time between a career and family.  This question will forever plague women until more group-practices are developed within other careers, but obstetrics has already changed their specialty and everyone has benefitted from the transformation. 
 

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[Using a Nursing Degree to Fight Global Crises]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/?p=340 2009-12-14T17:00:59Z 2009-12-14T17:00:59Z Most nursing students are well aware of the stories of Florence Nightingale and Clara Barton; in fact, these women might be the reason a vast majority of students decide to be nurses.  Their early dedication to the nursing industry is evident in their lasting namesakes and a wonder of how they were able to accomplish […]

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Most nursing students are well aware of the stories of Florence Nightingale and Clara Barton; in fact, these women might be the reason a vast majority of students decide to be nurses.  Their early dedication to the nursing industry is evident in their lasting namesakes and a wonder of how they were able to accomplish so much throughout the nineteenth century.  Fastforwarding to modern day reveals different outlooks for the nursing industry.  We still have nursing pioneers and famous nurses who accomplish more than was ever required of them, but the majority of nurses simply work the every-day general medicine jobs, some even lucky enough to work a 9-5 job.  However, there is still a way to reach out to people through nursing degrees, depending what you want to do with them.  

Currently, there is a heightened demand for health care workers in Africa especially: data has indicated that 800,000 health care workers are currently needed in the continent to meet health goals in reducing AIDS-related deaths by 2015.  The World Health Organization has recommended that the continent needs to have at least 2.28 doctors, nurses, and midwives per 1,000 people in order to met the goals set for it.  The United States itself has witnessed a growing number of nursing students who wish to travel to Africa and help many families in need.  This is still rare within the nursing community, but has led to many ripples within the health industry.  Even a small amount of aid goes a long way in such an impoverished section of the world, ravaged by growing epidemics. 

Residents of these impoverished nations are suffering from many diseases that are easily curable within Western nations, but because there is a lack of funds and subsequent lack of health care professionals, these citizens will continue to suffer until the goal of 800,000 are met.  These front-line health care professionals that work in these conditions should be as celebrated as Florence Nightingale is: they are giving up their friends, family, not to mention modern conveniences, in order to cater to a class of people on the other side of the world.  This is the reason to become a nurse: the satisfaction of knowing that you are truly making a difference in global society. 

While this type of global career is not for everyone, it offers many recipients of nursing degrees the opportunity to put their degree to use in an environment that is drastically different from the one they are accustomed to.  Thus far, it has been difficult for African countries to maintain a constant influx of health care workers since there is a high turnover rate, but South Africa should be the model for most health care professionals: it has grown through leaps and bounds after only a few years of intensive health care.  Africa is different than any other continent and contains conditions that yield to disease, but turning this around only takes a goal-ridden nursing student who wants to make a difference in the modern health world.  

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[Starting Salaries for Nurses]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/?p=392 2010-03-29T19:22:25Z 2009-12-10T19:22:03Z The economy has made many of us more conscious of what salaries our degrees will earn us, and made us more inclined to research into the salary and career requirements.  Nursing salaries vary according to the type of nursing you want to go into, which area of the country you want to practice, and especially […]

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The economy has made many of us more conscious of what salaries our degrees will earn us, and made us more inclined to research into the salary and career requirements.  Nursing salaries vary according to the type of nursing you want to go into, which area of the country you want to practice, and especially how much experience you have had (as most salaries do).  While starting salaries cannot base too much on experience, they look at your background degree, and the higher degree you have will lead to a higher salary. 

Location
Typical for the United States, most New England states have higher nurses salaries, although this is largely due to the cost of living in the area.  The average salary for New York nurses is $70,000, with Boston and Philadelphia not too far behind.  It is clear that the further South and West you want to travel, the lower your salary and cost of living will become, as Houston and Atlanta have the two lower salaries both around $60,000.  While this is not indicative of every community, it demonstrates more of the average range of salaries in the area. 

Experience
The levels of experience typically range from less than one year to over twenty years.  However, this gives many students an indicator of what they can expect from a starting salary up to several years in the industry.  Once again, these salaries depend on location, but the national average of a starting salary for a Bachelor’s in Science, Nursing, is $50,000.  After your first year, this can jump to $56,000 and eventually reach close to $70,000 after twenty years.  However, this is different for each type of nursing area.  Nursing managers and nursing directors earn up to $70,000 initially due to their heightened level of experience in the field.  RNs additionally earn around $6,000 more than BSNs at every level of experience, leading to higher salary in the long run.

Nursing is one field that is in constant demand for new workers and will continue to attract new students to its many programs around the country.   The excellent starting salaries are a good driving force for many potential students in the health care industry and there is always a high demand in many different communities.  Depending on what level of degree you want to earn (RN, BSN, CAN, PCA), you can earn a variety of different levels of salaries and experience an array of different life lessons at the same time. 
 

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Site Administrator <![CDATA[Dispelling the Rumors of Nursing Degrees]]> http://www.nursingdegreeguide.org/2009/dispelling-the-rumors-of-nursing-degrees/ 2009-12-09T19:43:42Z 2009-12-09T19:43:42Z Nursing jobs have become somewhat glamorized by Hollywood over the recent increase of hospital shows within the past few years including ER, Grey’s Anatomy, and Scrubs.  While the surgeons take over much of the time on Grey’s Anatomy, nurses are still a huge part of the show, and some of the main characters of ER […]

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Nursing jobs have become somewhat glamorized by Hollywood over the recent increase of hospital shows within the past few years including ER, Grey’s Anatomy, and Scrubs.  While the surgeons take over much of the time on Grey’s Anatomy, nurses are still a huge part of the show, and some of the main characters of ER and Scrubs are the head nurses of the respective hospitals.  Nursing degrees do lead to the ending result of the ability to save lives and help rehabilitate patients, but they do typically are not as glamorous as these shows make them appear to be.  Nursing degrees require students to be fully committed to the health industry and fully committed to their patients at the same time.

Nursing degrees can now be attained at a number of online institutions, making the RN requirement that much easier to earn, although many students are disappointed by their ending career placement.  Working aside sexy surgeons is not what propels most students to become a nurse, and the fact that these TV shows cater to false notions about the health industry is not helping health education.  A true nursing career requires hours of dedication to patients who need constant care and attention; there is little time for the social hours that so many of these shows indicate health care professionals have. 

Nursing degrees additionally require years of hard work and courses, requiring programs to weed out the students who think they can breeze through a health-care profession.  These students are left struggling when their first patient has a seizure or cannot stop bleeding.  However, despite dispelling the rumors of constant parties and social gatherings on TV shows, nursing careers are incredibly rewarding and uplifting.  Every day nurses are allowed the opportunity to connect with patients on a personal level and are the people in charge of monitoring their levels after surgery and performing examinations.

Drawing the line between fact and fiction is hard for any highly popularized career, but the health care industry has especially seen a rise in interest among the American public as a result of the many medical shows that have plagued airwaves in recent years.  While many of these shows do indicate what many hospitals have to undergo (once in a while), the vast majority only seem to glamorize a career which is meant to give back to the community and work to save lives.  Nursing degrees are a major part of this community, and bringing reality back to students is a necessary part of their schooling. 

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